Egg’n’Grog

Eggnog-1112

Holiday Eggnog (Spirited)

1 dozen eggs

1 pound powdered sugar

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup vanilla

8 cups evaporated milk

3 cups water

1 quart spiced rum (optional)

Nutmeg, to garnish

Beat eggs until light in color, gradually add sugar, salt and vanilla. Then add milk and water. Stir in rum (brandy, bourbon or rye may also be used). Cover the nog and ripen for 24 hours in the refrigerator. Stir again and garnish with whipped cream, a cinnamon stick and sprinkle with nutmeg.

Bacon Wrapped Feta & Almond Date Appetizers

Ingredients

16 large dates
2 oz. Mild Feta Cheese
32 PLANTERS FLAVOR GROVE Skinless Almonds Sea Salt & Olive Oil
8 slices bacon, cut in half
Directions

  1. Cut slit in long side of each date, being careful to not cut completely through date. Remove and discard pits. Cut cheese into 16 (1×1/4-inch) sticks. Stuff each date with cheese and 2 nuts.
  2. Wrap 1 bacon piece around each date, completely enclosing cheese. Place on rack of broiler pan.
  3. Bake 14 to 15 min. or until bacon is crisp, turning after 8 min. Cool 5 min; transfer to plate. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Creamy Mushroom Tartlet Appetizers

1 Tbsp.
butter
1 pkg.
(8 oz.) fresh mushrooms, finely chopped
1/2 cup
(1/2 of 8-oz. tub) PHILADELPHIA Chive & Onion Cream Cheese Spread
1/4 cup
 Grated Parmesan Cheese
1 can
(8 oz.) refrigerated crescent dinner rolls
2 tsp.
finely chopped fresh parsley

Directions

  1. Heat oven to 350°F.
  2. Melt butter in large nonstick skillet on medium heat. Add mushrooms; cook 5 min. or until tender, stirring frequently. Add cream cheese spread and Parmesan; cook and stir 1 min. or until cream cheese is melted. Remove from heat; set aside.
  3. Unroll dough into 2 long rectangles; firmly press perforations and seams together to seal. Cut each rectangle into 12 squares. Place 1 square in each of 24 mini muffin cups with corners of squares extending over rims of cups. Firmly press dough onto bottom and up side of each cup. Spoon about 1-1/2 tsp. mushroom mixture into each cup.
  4. Bake 10 to 12 min. or until golden brown. Sprinkle with parsley. Cool in pan 5 min. before serving.

Tamari~and~Maple~Roasted Almonds Crunchy, Sweet Smoky GOODNESS!

  • Yield Makes 2 cups
    Serves 6
Ingredients

  • 10 ounces whole shelled almonds
  • 1/4 cup reduced-sodium tamari
  • 3 tablespoons pure maple syrup
  • Nonstick cooking spray

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spread almonds in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet, and bake until lightly toasted and fragrant, 7 to 8 minutes.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine tamari and maple syrup. Add almonds, and toss until thoroughly coated. Lightly cover the baking sheet with cooking spray, and spread almonds evenly on sheet.
  3. Roast in oven until deep brown, stirring once, 15 to 17 minutes. Immediately transfer to a clean baking sheet, and spread out almonds, separating so nuts don’t touch. Let cool before serving.

10 Thanksgiving Foods Dangerous to Dogs

From: http://waginthebox.com

Here are 10 foods you should not give your dog on Thanksgiving, or any other day for that matter.

1. Bones: It seems counter-intuitive, we know, but bones are bad for dogs. Carmela Stamper, D.V.M., a veterinarian in the Center for Veterinary Medicine at the FDA, said, “Bones are unsafe, no matter what their size. Giving your dog a bone may make your pet a candidate for a trip to your veterinarian’s office later, possible emergency surgery or even death. Make sure you throw out bones from your own meals in a way that your dog can’t get to them.”

2. Raw or undercooked turkey: One reason: salmonella bacteria. You can get sick from handling raw food, and even though you may believe your dog’s stomach is iron-clad – it’s not.

3. Turkey skin: Seems harmless enough, right? It’s just the skin. But, as blogs.dogtime.com puts it, “High-fat foods, such as turkey skin and gravy, can be hazardous to your dog. Since the skin is hard to digest, it can lead to pancreatitis (symptoms are vomiting, extreme depression, reluctance to move and abdominal pain).”

The skin isn’t good for you either, so it’s best to throw it away and make more room for the mashed potatoes and gravy.

4. Dough and cake batter: It may sound like an urban legend, but the combination of raw dough and your dog’s body heat can actually cause the dough to rise inside his stomach. Bestbullysticks.com says this can result in vomiting, severe abdominal pain and bloating. Not to mention that the batter used in cakes and pies has raw eggs, which could contain salmonella bacteria. If you’re making a cake or pie, make sure your dog is not in the kitchen and, clean up any scraps or droppings that hit the floor right away.

5. Beer: Dogs love beer – well, mine do – but this doesn’t mean you should share a cold one with your dog. Beer can really do a number on your dog’s stomach.

“Alcohol, especially the hops in beer, can be particularly harmful to dogs, causing intoxication, panting, fever, racing heart, liver damage, even coma, seizures and death,” according to bestbullysticks.com.

6. Walnuts and macadamia nuts: These two nuts in particular are very bad for your dog. In fact, they could cause a toxic reaction called macadamia nut toxicosis. Dogblogtimes.com says, “Within twelve hours of eating the nuts, dogs can start to develop symptoms such as an inability to stand, ataxia (walking wobbly), depression, vomiting, muscle tremors, hyperthermia (elevated body temperature), weakness and an elevated heart rate. Usually the symptoms go away within 48 hours but the weakness, vomiting and fear can lead to dangerous, and sometimes deadly, shock.”

7. Mushrooms: Fungi are good for you, but bad for your dog. Should your dog ingest mushrooms, you can expect a slew of unwelcome symptoms that could become quite severe. Bestbullysticks.com says mushrooms can damage a number of internal organs, including kidneys, liver and the central nervous system. If your dog eats mushrooms, you can expect seizures, coma, vomiting and possibly death.

8. Onions and garlic: These two culprits are always on the list of foods your dog should not eat and for very good reason. They make your dog sick, period. Here’s why: These ingredients contain sulfides, which are toxic to dogs and can cause the destruction of red blood cells leading to Heinz body anemia.

9. Sage: This multi-purpose herb is used in countless recipes and for cleansing a new home, but to a dog, sage is bad. It contains essential oils and resins that can upset a dog’s stomach and do a number on his central nervous system.

10. Nutmeg: Nutmeg is a sneaky spice. Found in sweet potatoes, yams, pumpkin pie and most desserts, nutmeg has mild hallucinogenic properties that when ingested by your dog can cause, “seizures, tremors and central nervous system problems. In severe cases, shock and death have been reported,” according to blogs.dogtime.com. Note that both pumpkin and sweet potatoes are good for your dog; just make sure no nutmeg is on them before you share them with your dog.

It didn’t make our list, but chocolate is very, very bad for dogs. It’s not on the list because it should be a given for every pet parent – don’t feed your dog chocolate.

Roasted Turkey with Brown~ Sugar Glaze

Recipe and photo courtesy of Martha Stewart.com

  • Prep Time 40 minutes
  • Total Time 2 3/4 hours, plus resting
  • Yield Serves 8 to 10

Ingredients

  • 1 whole turkey (about 12 pounds), thawed if frozen, rinsed, and patted dry (neck and giblets chopped into 2-inch pieces; liver discarded)
  • 2 medium carrots, roughly chopped
  • 2 celery stalks, roughly chopped
  • 1 large yellow onion, roughly chopped
  • Nonstick cooking spray
  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • Coarse salt and ground pepper
  • 2/3 cup cider vinegar
  • 1/2 cup packed dark-brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated orange zest, plus 2 tablespoons orange juice

Directions

  1. Let turkey sit at room temperature 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 425 degrees, with racks in upper and lower thirds. Place neck, giblets, carrots, celery, and onion in a heavy-bottomed metal roasting pan. Set a roasting rack over vegetables and coat with cooking spray.
  2. Tuck wing tips underneath body of turkey. Tie legs together with kitchen twine. Rub turkey all over with 2 tablespoons butter; season with salt and pepper. Place turkey on rack in pan; roast on bottom oven rack until golden brown, 30 minutes. Reduce heat to 350 degrees. Add 2 cups water to pan; roast until an instant-read thermometer inserted in thickest part of a thigh reads 125 degrees, about 1 hour.
  3. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, bring vinegar, brown sugar, and orange juice to a boil over high, stirring occasionally. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, until mixture is syrupy, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat and whisk in 2 tablespoons butter and orange zest.
  4. When thermometer reads 125 degrees, brush turkey with glaze. Rotate pan and roast, brushing turkey with remaining glaze every 15 minutes, until thermometer inserted in the thickest part of a thigh reads 165 degrees, 30 to 45 minutes (tent turkey with foil if browning too quickly). Transfer turkey to a platter. Loosely tent with foil and let rest 30 minutes before carving. Reserve pan with drippings for pan gravy.